We don’t need a list of rights and wrongs, tables of dos and don’ts: we need books, time, and silence. Thou shalt not is soon forgotten, but Once upon a time lasts forever.

Philip Pullman (via victoriousvocabulary)

thegoddamazon:

awkwardsituationist:

BAJAU LAUT: LAST OF THE SEA NOMADS

the bajau laut are some of the world’s last true sea normads, living as they have for centuries almost entirely in the waters of the coral triangle (“the amazon of the seas”) on long boats known as lepa lepa.

hunters of fish, pearls and sea cucumbers, the bajau people free dive to depths of 20 meters, hold their breath for up to three minutes, and spend up to 60% of their time in the water submerged - the equivalent of a sea otter.  it is a common practice amongst bajau people to intentionally burst their ear drums at an early age to deal with the problem of equalizing.

as photographer james morgan explains, “traditional bajau cosmology - a syncretism of animism and islam - reveals a complex relationship with the ocean, which for them is a multifarious and living entity. there are spirits in currents and tides, in coral reefs and mangroves.” the bajau people, for example, will not spit in the ocean.

in the last few decades, dwindling fish stocks and government efforts have forced many to settle permanently on land and abandon a life of self sufficiency known as cari laut, or ‘searching the ocean’. a dwindling few, however, still choose to live the majority of their lives at sea

This is so fucking amazing.

Like seriously. Fucking. Amazing.

(via pangeantrance)

nubbsgalore:

jim and jamie dutcher, determined to show “the hidden life of wolves”, lived for six years with a pack of wolves in the idaho wilderness of yellowstone. a constant but unobtrusive presence, the dutchers earned the unshakable trust of the wolves, and came to know them as complex, highly intelligent animals with distinct individual personalities, who are caring, playful and above all devoted to family.

"only a select few other species exhibit these same traits so clearly," they note. "they are capable of not only emotion but also real compassion. this is the view of the wolf that we want to share. …it is an animal that cares for its sick and desperately needs to be part of something bigger than itself - the pack. the bond a wolf has to its pack is certainly as strong as the bond a human being has to his or her family."

they add, “rarely did two wolves pass each other without playfully rubbing shoulders together or exchanging a brief lick. so often we would see two wolves relaxing together, curled up beside each other.” the dutchers also recount wolf behavior rarely documented: grief at the death of a pack mate; excitement over the birth of pups; and the shared role of raising young pack members.

but as the wolves struggle to reestablish their foothold in the american west, their public demonization continues.  say the dutchers, “as we see wolves, once again, being shot, trapped and poisoned, we recognize that our unique experience, living with wolves, is unlikely to ever happen again, and for that reason we feel that we have an obligation to share the lives of these wolves we with the widest audience possible.”

it’s not just the wolves at stake, but the entire yellowstone ecosystem. wolves keep the elk gene pool strong (no other predator does this); they redistribute elk herds, allowing vegetation to recover along rivers and streams, which provides food for beavers; and they keep the number of coyotes in check, which helps to maintain populations of rodents, antelopes and birds of prey. 

(via endymions)

webofgoodnews:

A builder who had a passion for gardening gave extra turnips to a food pantry. Then he decided to give away 100% of his family-raised crops.
"It started out with a load of turnips. Too many turnips," his daughter Mary Gibson Bell said.
She said he donated the extra turnips from his garden to FISH Hospitality food pantry.
"He grew up hungry. And he said he never wanted to see anyone else go hungry again," she said.
Her father decided to plant a lot more the next season to give away.
"You take the delivery and you go see where it goes and you see all the people who it feeds it’s like wow. Out in the field it’s like why am I doing it but then you get out there and you see it— it makes a total different story after that," his grandson Tate Harris said.
Read more
Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews:

A builder who had a passion for gardening gave extra turnips to a food pantry. Then he decided to give away 100% of his family-raised crops.

"It started out with a load of turnips. Too many turnips," his daughter Mary Gibson Bell said.

She said he donated the extra turnips from his garden to FISH Hospitality food pantry.

"He grew up hungry. And he said he never wanted to see anyone else go hungry again," she said.

Her father decided to plant a lot more the next season to give away.

"You take the delivery and you go see where it goes and you see all the people who it feeds it’s like wow. Out in the field it’s like why am I doing it but then you get out there and you see it— it makes a total different story after that," his grandson Tate Harris said.

Read more

Webofgoodnews.com

Space echoes like an immense tomb, yet the stars still burn. Why does the sun take so long to die?

Nick Land, The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism (via ontheedgeofdarkness)

(via osjecam)